Flotsam/ Jetsam

Designed by: LeuWebb Project

 

 

 

 

 

The Flotsam/Jetsam casts are a limited series of design objects conceptualized and created in Toronto, Canada. Born first of a temporary artwork for the IN/FUTURE Festival in September 2016, the objects live in their second iteration as a take-home product, shareable pieces that people can have of their own, beyond the installation. They are objects which showcase our love of architecture alongside our desire to create products which capture the rich historical and cultural contexts of the city in which we base our practice.

 

 

 

 

 

The now-defunct Ontario Place theme park remains an iconic architectural site in Toronto. In 2016, our design studio re-imagined its waterfront through an integrated public installation — one which considered souvenirs, architectural fragments, and natural objects as vessels that represent and carry history. After unearthing historic photographs and conducting site visits of the Cinesphere, pods, and pavilions, we prototyped and 3D-printed miniature versions of the retro-futuristic buildings —designed by renowned Canadian architect Eberhard Zeidler. We then used these 3D-printed prototypes to create silicone moulds, allowing us to cast hundreds of plaster objects for the installation.

 

 

 

 

 

Flotsam/Jetsam casts The Flotsam/Jetsam casts are a limited series of design objects conceptualized and created in Toronto, Canada. Born first of a temporary artwork for the IN/FUTURE Festival in September 2016, the objects live in their second iteration as a take-home product, shareable pieces that people can have of their own, beyond the installation. They are objects which showcase our love of architecture alongside our desire to create products which capture the rich historical and cultural contexts of the city in which we base our practice.

 

 

 

 

The now-defunct Ontario Place theme park remains an iconic architectural site in Toronto. In 2016, our design studio re-imagined its waterfront through an integrated public installation — one which considered souvenirs, architectural fragments, and natural objects as vessels that represent and carry history. After unearthing historic photographs and conducting site visits of the Cinesphere, pods, and pavilions, we prototyped and 3D-printed miniature versions of the retro-futuristic buildings —designed by renowned Canadian architect Eberhard Zeidler.

 

 

 

 

We then used these 3D-printed prototypes to create silicone moulds, allowing us to cast hundreds of plaster objects for the installation. Like the real detritus that has collected along the shoreline of Ontario Place, Flotsam/Jetsam took the form of lake debris scattered along the beach. Quietly intervening on the ecology of the site, hundreds of miniature versions of the buildings were strewn among the rocks, as though they had simply washed up on the shore. These design objects are reflections on the advent of Ontario Place after Expo ‘67, a utopian moment in time for design and architecture. Scattered along the shore, the mysterious relics of Flotsam/Jetsam were designed to inspire questions about what happened to those original aspirations and dreams.

 

 

 

 

 

Throughout the exhibition, the cast started disappearing and the beach had to be re-stocked multiple times; festival patrons were taking the objects home with them. We loved that our casts had at once become a souvenir of Ontario Place in 2016— the future of which continues to remain unclear. Toronto is a dynamically diverse city of creatives, many of whom are inspired by the visual cues present on our streets and across our skyline.

 

 

 

The Flotsam/Jetsam casts compress these visual cues into objects that can be displayed on a desk, used as a paperweight, or invoked into another outdoor environment, like a garden. They are quiet objects, sustainable in their production, and embodying a much larger story about design excellence.

 

 

The Flotsam/Jetsam casts were handcrafted by LeuWebb Projects.

The plaster for the casts, and the silicone for the moulds were purchased from Sculpture Supply Store in Toronto.

 

The three-dimensional model was printed at a Digital Innovation Hub of the Toronto Public Library.